100 sample questions on The Transfer of Property Act, 1882 for Goa Judiciary Examination (preliminary)

100 sample questions on The Transfer of Property Act, 1882 for Goa Judiciary Examination (preliminary)

1. Before the commencement of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, the transfer of immovable properties in India were governed by the

(a) principles of English law and equity

(b) Indian Registration Act, 1908

(c) British State of Goods Act, 1880

(d) Indian Contract Act, 1872.

2. The courts, before the enactment of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, were forcing to decide property disputes according to their own notion and justice and fairplay,

(a) because judges were making own laws

(b) because of absence of any specific statutory provisions on the property matters

(c) because British Judges were confused with Indian property disputes

(d) because judges were educated in British property laws.

3. Law Commission for the Transfer of Property matters was appointed in England and the Draft Bill prepared by the Commission was introduced in Legislative Council in

(a) 1870

(b) 1875

(c) 1877

(d) 1882.

4. The Bill on Transfer of Property was referred to

(a) First Law Commission

(b) Second Law Commission

(c) Third Law Commission

(d) Fourth Law Commission.

5. The Transfer of Property Act was enacted in the year

(a) 1880

(b) 1881

(c) 1882

(d) 1883.

6. The Transfer of Property Act received its assent on

(a) 17th February, 1882

(b) 22nd February, 1882

(c) 23rd February, 1882

(d) 27th February, 1882.

7. First Amendment was made in the Transfer of Property Act, 1882 in the year

(a) 1880

(b) 1883

(c) 1884

(d) 1885.

8. The Transfer of Property Act, 1882, came into effect from

(a) 17th February, 1882

(b) 27th February, 1882

(c) 17th March, 1882

(d) 1st July, 1882.

9. The Transfer of Property Act, 1882, extends in first instance to the whole of India except:

(a) territories which, immediately before 1st November, 1956 were comprised in Part B States or in State of Bombay, Punjab and Delhi

(b) territories which immediately before 1st November, 1956, were comprised in Part B State or in States of Bombay, Bihar and West Bengal

(c) it extends in first instance to the whole of India except the territories which immediately before 1st November, 1956, were comprised in Part B States of Madras, West Bengal and Manipur

(d) it extends in first instance to the whole of India except the territories which immediately before 1st November, 1956 were comprised in Part B States of Assam, Manipur and Tripura.

10. According to the Transfer of Property Act, 1882 any State Government may from time to time exempt either any part of territories from all or any of sections

(a) 54, paragraphs 2 and 3, 59,107 and 123

(b) 54,107 and 123

(c) 54, 107 and 120

(d) 54,107 and 113.

11. Within the meaning of provisions of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, the immovable property does not include:

(a) standing timber or grass

(b) standing timber, jewellery and crops

(c) standing timber, growing crops or grass

(d) only grass.

12. According to Transfer of Property Act, 1882

(a) instrument means a non-testamentary instrument

(b) testamentary instrument

(c) both testamentary and non- testamentary instrument

(d) none of the above.

13. Under the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, the term "attested" means

(a) attested by two or more witnesses

(b) attested by one witness only

(c) attested by two witnesses only

(d) no condition prevails.

14. Under the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, registered pertains to

(a) registration of property

(b) registration of documents

(c) registration of parties

(d) none of the above.

15. Under the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, "attached to earth" means:

(I) routed in the earth, as in the case of trees and shrubs;

(II) imbedded in the earth as in the case of walls and buildings; or

(III) attached to what is so imbedded for the permanent beneficial enjoyment of that to which it is attached.

(a) only (I) and (II) are correct

(b) only (II) and (III) are correct

(c) only (I) and (III) are correct

(d) all (I), (II) and (III) are correct.

16. The chapters and sections of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, which relate to contracts shall be part of:

(a) Indian Registration Act, 1908

(b) Sale of Goods Act, 1930

(c) General Clauses Act, 1897

(d) Indian Contract Act, 1872.

17. Within the meaning of section 4 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882 the provisions of sections 54, paragraphs 2 and 3, sections 59, 107 and 123 shall be read as supplemented to:

(a) Indian Contract Act, 1872

(b) Indian Registration Act, 1908

(c) General Clauses Act, 1897

(d) Sale of Goods Act, 1930.

18. Chapter II of the Transfer of Property Act shall not be deemed to effect any rule of

(a) Mohammadan law

(b) Christian law

(c) Parsi law

(d) none of the above.

19. According to section 5 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, living person includes:

(a) company or association or body of individuals

(b) individual human being only

(c) only important company or associations

(d) none of the above.

20. Under the provisions of section 6 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, the chance of an heir-apparent succeeding to an estate, the chance of a relation abstaining a legacy on the death of a kinsman, or any other mere possibility of like nature:

(a) cannot be transferred

(b) can be transferred

(c) can be transferred subject to certain conditions

(d) none of the above.

21. Under the provisions of section 6 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, a mere right of re-entry for breach of a condition subsequent cannot be transferred to any one except the owner of the property affected thereby

(a) the statement is true

(b) the statement is false

(c) the statement is partly true

(d) none of the above.

22. Under the provisions of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, an easement cannot be transferred apart from the dominant heritage

(a) the statement is true

(b) the statement is false

(c) the statement is partly true

(d) none of the above.

23. According to the provisions of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, all interest in property restricted in its enjoyment to the owner personally cannot be transferred by him

(a) the statement is true

(b) the statement is false

(c) the statement is partly true

(d) none of the above.

24. Under the provisions of section 6 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882

(a) a right to future maintenance can be transferred

(b) cannot be transferred

(c) no such provision is made in the Act

(d) none of the above.

25. Under the provisions of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882

(a) a mere right to sue can be transferred

(b) a mere right to sue cannot be transferred

(c) no such provision is made in the Act

(d) none of the above.

26. Under the Transfer of Property Act, 1882

(a) the salary of a public officer can be transferred

(b) the salary of a public officer cannot be transferred

(c) no such provision is found in the Act

(d) none of the above.

27. Under the Transfer of Property Act, 1882

(a) a public office cannot be transferred

(b) a public office can be transferred

(c) such provision is absent in the Act

(d) none of the above.

28. Under the provisions of section 6 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, no transfer can be made for an unlawful object or consideration within the meaning of section 23 of the Indian Contract Act, 1872

(a) the statement is false

(b) the statement is true

(c) the statement is partly true

(d) none of the above.

29. Under the provisions of section 7 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, the competent person to transfer means:

I. Every person competent to contract only;

II. Every person entitled to transferable property or authorised to dispose of transferable property.

(a) only (I) is correct

(b) both (I) and (II) are correct

(c) (II) is correct

(d) neither is correct.

30. The term "transfer" under the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, refers to

(a) partly or whole transfer

(b) absolute or conditional transfer

(c) contingent transfer

(d) both (a) and (b) are correct.

31. Under section 8 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882 the legal incidents also includes-

(a) machinery attached to earth and the moveable parts thereof

(b) only machinery attached to earth

(c) only moveable parts of the machinery attached to earth

(d) none of the above.

32. Under the provisions of section 9 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882 the transfer includes-

(a) also oral transfer

(b) written transfer only

(c) only (a) is correct

(d) only (b) is correct.

33. Under the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, where a writing is not expressly required by law:

(a) a transfer of properties may be made without writing in every case

(b) a transfer of property is subject to only writing

(c) no provision of oral transfer is made

(d) none of the above.

34. Under the Transfer of Property Act, 1882 the condition restraining alienation is provided in

(a) section 10

(b) section 9

(c) section 8

(d) section 7.

35. Where in a Transfer of Property, an interest is created absolutely in favour of any person though the terms of the transfer direct that such interest shall be applied or enjoyed by him in a particular member:

(a) he shall be entitled to receive and dispose of such interest as if there were no such direction

(b) he shall not be entitled to interest

(c) he shall be entitled to interest subject to terms and conditions

(d) none of the above.

36. Under section 12 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882 where the transfer of property is subject to conditions or limitations making interest therein to the benefit of person to lease on his becoming involved or endeavouring to transfer or dispose of property, such condition is:

(a) valid

(b) void

(c) partly void

(d) none of the above.

37. Provisions of section 12 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882

(a) does not apply to lease condition in the benefit of the lessor

(b) does apply to a condition in a lease for the benefit of lessor

(c) no such condition is made under such provision

(d) none of the above.

38. The rules against the perpetuity is provided in section …….of the Transfer of Property

Act, 1882

(a) 14

(b) 15

(c) 16

(d) 17.

39. No transfer of property can operate to create an interest which is to take effect after the life time of one or more persons living at the date of such transfer. These provisions come under:

(a) rules against retrospective transfer only

(b) rules against perpetuity

(c) rules against prospective transfer

(d) none of the above.

40. Under section 16 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882 where an interest created for the benefit of a person or class of persons fails then:

(a) any interest created in the same transaction intended to take effect after

or upon failure of such prior interest also fails

(b) any interest created in the same transaction and intended to take effect after or upon failure of such prior interest does not fail

(c) such failure does not affect

(d) none of the above.

41. Provision of longer period in the matter of accumulation of property under section 17 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882 amounts to

(a) 18 years

(b) 20 years

(c) 22 years

(d) 25 years.

42. Under the provisions of section 17 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, the income arising from the property shall be accumulated either wholly or in part during a period

(a) longer than life of the transferor

(b) shorter than life of transferor

(c) no such period is mentioned

(d) none of the above.

43. Under the provisions of section 18 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, the provisions of some sections shall not apply in case of a transfer of property for the benefit of the public in the advancement of religion, knowledge, commerce, health, safety or any other object beneficial to mankind. These sections are:

(a) 13,14, 15 and 16

(b) 14,16 and 17

(c) 14,16,17 and 18

(d) 14,15 and 20.

44. The provision of vested interest is provided in:

(a) section 18 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882

(b) section 19 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882

(c) section 20 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882

(d) section 21 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882.

45. According to the provisions of section 19 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882

(a) the vested interest is not defeated by the death of the transferee before he obtains possession

(b) vested interest is defeated by the death of transferee before he obtains possession

(c) no such provision is made

(d) none of the above.

46. Under the provisions of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, the unborn person acquires vested interest on transfer for his benefit:

(a) upon his birth

(b) 7 days after his birth

(c) J2 days after his birth

(d) no such provision is made in the Act.

47. Under the provisions of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882 an unborn person acquires vested interest on transfer upon his birth, although

(a) he may not be entitled to the enjoyment immediately on his birth

(b) he is entitled after 7 days after his birth

(c) no such provision is made

(d) none of the above.

48. In the context of contingent interest in case of happening of a uncertain event or if a specified uncertain event shall not happen, such person acquires a contingent interest in the property. Such interest

(a) becomes vested interest in the former case, on the happening of the event, in the later, when the happening of event becomes impossible

(b) does not become vested interest

(c) vested interest does not depend upon happening or not happening of event

(d) none of the above.

49. The provision of contingent interest is provided in:

(a) section 20 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882

(b) section 21 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882

(c) section 22 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882

(d) section 23 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882.

50. Where interest on transfer of property is created in favour of members only of a class as shall attain a particular age:

(a) such interest does not vest in any member of the class who has not attained that age

(b) such interest vests in any member irrespective of class who has not attained that age

(c) no such provision is made under the Act

(d) none of the above.

51. A transfers property to B for life and after his death to C and D, equally to be divided between them or to the survivors of them. C dies during life of B. D survives B. At B's death the property:

(a) shall pass to D

(b) shall pass to any person

(c) shall pass to person who is specifically named in transfer

(d) none of the above.

52. The provisions of conditional transfer is provided in the Transfer of Property Act, 1882

(a) section 25

(b) section 26

(c) section 27

(d) section 29.

53. X transfers Rs. 500 to Y on condition that he shall execute a certain lease within three months after V's death, and, if he should neglect to do so to Z. If Y dies in X's life time.

(a) the disposition in favour of Z takes effect

(b) the disposition shall not take effect in favour of Z

(c) the disposition requires further conditions

(d) none of the above.

54. X marries to Y but in case she dies in his lifetime, he would transfer the property to Z. X and Y perish together, under circumstances which make it impossible to probe that she died before him. The disposition of property in favour of Z:

(a) does not take effect

(b) takes effect

(c) disposition is subject to another contract

(d) none of the above.

55. Under the provisions of section 29 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882 an ulterior disposition of the kind contemplated in the provision of section 28 can not take effect unless:

(a) condition is strictly fulfilled

(b) condition is not fulfilled

(c) only (b) is correct

(d) none of the above.

56. In case of transfer of property under the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, if the ulterior disposition is not valid then

(a) the prior disposition is affected by it

(b) the prior disposition is not affected by it

(c) no such condition is prevailed under the Transfer of Property Act, 1882

(d) none of the above.

57. A transfer a garden to B for her life, with a proviso that, in case B cuts down a certain wood, the transfer shall cease to have any effect. B cuts down the wood. Decide the case in the light of Transfer of Property Act, 1882

(a) B loses his life interest in the firm

(b) B does not lose his life interest in the firm

(c) no such provision is made under the Transfer of Property Act, 1882

(d) none of the above.

58. Under the provisions of section 35 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, where a person professes to transfer property which he has no right to transfer, and as part of the same transaction confers any benefit on the owner of the property then

(a) such owner must elect either to confirm such transfer or to dissent from it

(b) such owner can elect to confirm such transfer only

(c) such owner can dissent from transfer only

(d) none of the above.

59. The foundation of doctrine of election under the Transfer of Property Act, 1882 is that a person taking the benefit of an instrument:

(a) must bear the burden

(b) must not bear the burden

(c) burden is not the subject of election

(d) none of the above.

60. The rule of election under the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, as applied to Will is enacted in sections 180 and 192 of the:

(a) Indian Succession Act, 1925

(b) Indian Registration Act, 1908

(c) Sale of Goods Act, 1930

(d) General Clauses Act, 1897.

61. A person is not put to his election, unless he has a proprietary interest in the property disposed off in derogation of his rights. This is the subject matter under provisions of:

(a) section 35 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882

(b) section 35 of the Indian Registration Act, 1908

(c) section 35 of the Indian Succession Act, 1925

(d) General Clauses Act, 1897.

62. Section 37 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882 refers to apportionment by estate. In this light, before the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, when a transfer was severed by the sale of shares in the version the tenant was still obliged to pay the rent to all shares jointly:

(a) unless an apportionment had been agreed to by all the parties

(b) any party is agreed by all the parties

(c) any two parties are agreed

(d) none of the above.

63. In the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, sections 33 to 37 apply to both immovable and movable property whereas sections 38 to 53 apply to:

(a) movable property only

(b) immovable property

(c) both immovable and movable property

(d) none of the above.

64. Provisions of section 38 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882 does not apply to cases falling under:

(a) benamidars or ostensible owners who can give no title except by estoppel

(b) contingent transfer which is based on happening and not happening of certain events

(c) perpetual transfer

(d) none of the above.

65. Section 38 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, has no application

(a) to previous transfer where the transaction is still incomplete

(b) to succeeding transfer where the transaction is to be completed in future

(c) to perpetuity transfer

(d) none of the above.

66. Under section 39 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882 the provision is made for transfer where the third person is entitled to maintenance. In this context the court held that right of maintenance, even of a Hindu widow, is an identified right which falls short of a charge. This was decided in case of:

(a) Ramanandan v. Rangammal, (1889) 12 Mad 260

(b) Ram Kumar v. Ram Dai, (1900) 22 All 326

(c) Rachawa v. Shivayogoda, (1893) 18 Bom 679

(d) none of the above.

67. Right to maintenance under the provisions of section 39 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882 includes the enhanced maintenance in future to these if there has been a material change in the circumstances. This was decided in case of:

(a) Adiveppa v. Tengawum, (1974) 2 Karn LJ 45

(b) Kaveri v. Parameswari, AIR 1971 Ker 216

(c) Dattatreya v. Julsabai, (1943) Bom 646

(d) Pranlal v. Chapsey, AIR 1945 Bom 34.

68. Within the provisions of section 39 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882 the word "maintenance" covers also residence. This was decided in case of:

(a) Kaveri v. Parameswari, AIR 1971 Ker 216

(b) Ramamurtlii v. Kanakaratnam, (1948) Mad 315

(c) Akhoy Kumar v. Corporation of Calcutta, (1915) 42 Cal 625

(d) Mama v. Bachchi, (1906) 26 All 655.

69. Within the meaning of provision under section 39 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882 a woman is entitled to maintenance not only from the husband, but also from sons who are members of joint family. This was decided in case of:

(a) S. Periaswami v. Cliellaival, (1980) 1 Mad LJ 46

(b) Raghvan v. Nagamal, (1979) 1 Mad LJ 172

(c) Chandramna v. Mamam Vankettareddy, AIR 1958 AP 396

(d) Basudev Dei Sarkar v. Chhaya Dey Sarkar, AIR 1991 Cal 399.

70. Under the provisions of section 40 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, the right referred to in First Paragraph of this section refers to:

(a) right of transferer as against purchase from a transferee to restrain the breach of a negative covenant

(b) negative right of transferer as against purchaser from a transferee to restrain the breach of a negative covenant

(c) mixed right of both purchaser and transferer

(d) none of the above.

71. Within the meaning of section 40 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, the right referred to in First Paragraph of this section refers to:

(a) is not a transferee by operation of law

(b) is a transferee by operation of law

(c) is a transferee by operation of law and is not a transferee within the meaning of section 40

(d) none of the above.

72. The transfer by ostensible owner is provided in .......section of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882

(a) section 38

(b) section 39

(c) section 40

(d) section 41.

73. With the express or implied consent of interested person in immovable property, a person is the ostensible owner of such property and transfers the same for consideration, then the transfer shall not be:

(a) voidable

(b) void

(c) valid

(d) none of the above.

74. The section 41 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882 is the statutory application of the law of estoppel. The statement is

(a) true

(b) false

(c) partly true

(d) none of the above.

75. Section 41 of the Transfer of the Property Act, 1882 applies to voluntary transfers and

has no application to:

(a) court sale

(b) contingent sale

(c) perpetuity sale

(d) price less sale.

76. Under the provisions of section 41 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, these are some conditions:

(1) Transferer is the ostensible owner.

(2) He is so by the consent, express or implied, of the real owner.

(3) Transfer is for consideration.

(4) Transferee has acted in good faith, taking reasonable care to ascertain that the transferer had power to transfer.

(a) only (1) and (2) are required 81.

(b) only (1), (2) and (3) are required

(c) only (3) and (4) are required

(d) all are required. (D

77. Possession of a manager cannot be treated

as ostensible ownership with the consent of (2) the real owner. This was held in case of:

(a) Seshumulla M. Shah v. Sayed Abdul Rashid, AIR 1991 Kant 273

(b) Ved Kumar v. Union of India, AIR 1989 NOC 136

(c) Motimul Sowvar v. Vijalakshi Ammal, AIR 1965 Mad 432

(d) B. Sitaram Rao v. Bibhushana, AIR 1978 Ori 222.

78. Inaccuracy in the recitals describing the property:

(a) cannot whitle down the effect of clear recitals in the documents about the

property to be sold thereby

(b) can whitle down the effect of clear recitals in the document about the property to be sold thereby

(c) cannot depend upon the inaccuracy or accuracy of recital describing property

(d) none of the above.

79. Under section 42 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882 if a person has a right to transfer property, after exercising a right to revoke a previous transfer, a transfer of such property by him will imply an exercise of:

(a) right of revocation

(b) right of transfer

(c) right of surrender

(d) none of the above.

80. Section 43 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882 enables a transferee to whom a transferer has made a fraudulent or erroneous representation to lay hold, at his option, of any interest:

(a) which the transferor may subsequently acquire with property, provided he does not adversely affect the right of any subsequent purchaser for value without notice

(b) which the transferee may rescind the proceeding

(c) which both transferor and transferee rescind

(d) none of the above.

81. In order to get the benefit of the section 43 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882 some conditions are necessary:

(1) Contract of transfer was made by a person who was competent to contract.

(2) Contract would be subsisting at the time when a claim for recovery of the property is made.

(a) both (1) and (2) necessary

(b) only (1) is necessary

(c) only (2) is necessary

(d) none of the above.

82. Section 44 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, deals with:

(a) transfer by two co-owner

(b) transfer by one co-owner

(c) transfer by 3 co-owners

(d) transfers by all co-owners.

83.When one of several co-owners transfers his share, the transferee acquires as against the other co-owners the same rights that of transferor had but is subject to any condition and liabilities affecting the share at the date of transfer. This is the provision under:

(a) section 40 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882

(b)section 41 of the transfer of property Act,1882

(c) ) section 42 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882

(d) ) section 44 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882

84. The provision for the joint transfer for consideration is dealt in:

(a) section 45 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882

(b) section 46 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882

(c) section 46 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882

(d) none of the above.

85. Presumption of equity pertains to:

(a) section 45 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882

(b) section 46 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882

(c) section 47 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882

(d) section 48 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882.

86. Under the provisions of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, where immovable property is transferred for consideration by persons having distinct interests therein, the transferors are:

(a) entitled to share in the considerations equally

(b) entitled to share unequally

(c) entitled to share equally but subject to further

(d) none of the above.

87. Where several co-owners of immovable property transfer a share therein without specifying that the transfer is to take effect on any particular share or shares of the transfers, the transfer, as among such transferors, takes effect on such share:

(a) inequally where the shares were equal and where they are unequal propor­tionally to the extent of such shares

(b) equally where the share were equal and where they are unequal propor­tionately to the extent of such shares

(c) only (a) is correct

(d) none of the above.

88. Within the meaning of section 48 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, the transfer cannot prejudice the rights of the transferee by any subsequent dealing with the property. This self-evident proposition is expressed in

(a) equitable maxim qui prior est tempore potior est jure

(b) quid pro co

(c) bona fide transfer

(d) none of the above.

89. The provision of improvements made by bona fide holders under defective titles is dealt in:

(a) section 50 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882

(b) section 51 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882

(c) section 53 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882

(d) none of the above.

90. A lessee cannot appeal to this section 51 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882. The statement is

(a) true

(b) false

(c) partly true

(d) none of the above.

91. Some conditions must be fulfilled before the equity provided in section 51, arises

(1) The person evicted must be transferee.

(2) The person must have made the improvements believing in good faith that he was absolutely entitled.

(a) only (1) is correct

(b) only (2) is correct

(c) both (1) and (2) are correct

(d) none of the above.

92. A treepasser is not a transferee within the meaning of section 51 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882 and he is not entitled to compensation for improvements. This was decided in:

(a) Daya Ram v. Shyam Sundari, (1965) 1 SCR 231

(b) Krishan Prasad v. Adyanath Ghatak, AIR 1944 Pat 77

(c) Bhupendra v. Pyari, (1917) 40 IC 464

(d) none of the above.

93. The terms good faith in section 51 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882 is used in the light of

(a) Sale of Goods Act, 1930

(b) General Clauses Act, 1897

(c) Indian Registration Act, 1908

(d) Specific Relief Act, 1963.

94. Section 51 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, does not apply to

(a) court sale

(b) auction sale

(d) none of the above.

95. Within the meaning of section 51 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882, the transferee:

(a) has lien on land for the value of improvements

(b) has no lien on the land for the value of improvements

(c) has condition lien on the land for the value of improvements

(d) none of the above.

96. Section 52 of Transfer of Property Act, 1882 imposes a prohibition on transfer or otherwise dealing of any property during the pendency of a suit, provided the conditions laid down in section are satisfied. The statement is:

(a) false

(b) true

(c) partly true

(d) none of the above.

97. The principle of lis pendens embodied in section 52 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882 pertains to:

(a) bona fide purchase

(b) public policy

(c) auction sale

(d) none of the above.

98. Rule of lis pendens is applicable to suits for specific performance of contracts to transfer immovable property. The statement is:

(a) true

(b) false

(c) partly true

(d) none of the above.

99. Rule of lis pendens is applicable to suits for specific performance of contracts to transfer immovable property. This statement is:

(a) false

(b) true

(c) partly false

(d) none of the above.

100. In case of a transfer hit by the doctrine of lis pendens, the question of good faith which is essential to be established before a equitable relief can be granted in favour of a subsequent vendee under sections 41 or 51 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882 is:

(a) relevant

(b) partly relevant

(c) totally irrelevant

(d) partly irrelevant.